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December 7, 2018 Issue  
Lansing, New York  
Volume 14, Issue 46

posticon Town Considers Anti-Nuclear Weapon Resolution

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Nuclear Weapon Ban Resolution

It wasn't nuclear war, but there was certainly dissension among Lansing Town Board members Wednesday as they debated whether or not to vote on a resolution calling on the federal government to sign a nuclear weapons prohibition treaty.  The discussion was in response to Lansing resident Dennis Osika's plea a few weeks ago to pass such a resolution.  Wednesday's discussion centered on whether the Town government should reach beyond its jurisdiction on issues of concern, or simply conduct Town business.

"Not doing this does not mean that we don't take this seriously," argued Supervisor Ed LaVigne. "But when you grow up with the bomb you realize what you can and cannot do.  My point is we need to discuss town issues when we do it as a town.  If you want to write private letters to Congress and the State Assembly and State Senate, they're more than happy to receive them, but I get very concerned when we start a precedent down this road when we were elected to take care of the Town.  Because we don't address this with a resolution does not mean we're not concerned about it.  It means we are trying to address what we were elected to do, which is the town."

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posticon Village May Add New Waterfront Park

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Poison Ivy Point

Lakefront parks in the Village of Lansing may be accessible if plans actually come to fruition.  Mayor Donald Hartill said Monday that the Village is in negotiations with the Bolton Point  Water Commission to purchase a plot of land together that will accommodate both a new pump station for the water commission and a lakefront park for the Village.  The final piece will be obtaining access for park visitors to cross the railroad tracks that legally separate the existing park, Poison Ivy Point, and the mainland.

"There is a lot for sale just to the north of that pump station, and it has 250 feet of frontage on the lake," Hartill said. "It also has a steep slope and a more or less flat spot on top where you could build a house.  (General Manager Steve Riddle) and I have been discussing how we could go forward with this by a combination of Bolton Point and the Village buying the parcel, subdivide off the piece that Bolton Point needs for the plant.  One possibility is for us to sell the portion you could build on and retain the steep slope and the lake frontage as a village park."

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posticon No More License Fee Exemption For Service Dogs

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Dog License Change

The Lansing Town Board unanimously adopted a change to town law regarding license fees for service dogs.  The new law, which amends a 2015 law regarding licensing, identifying, and controlling dogs in Lansing, changes how licensing fees are charged, applying fees equally to 'support dogs' and regular pets.

"We're changing the fee structure so we will now charge licensing fees to people with service animals," said Councilman Joe Wetmore. "The problem is more and more people are claiming every animal is a service animal to avoid fees, and to allow dogs to come into restaurants and stuff.  It's being abused.  To stop that we decided to change the law to charge the same amount to everybody, service dogs or not."

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posticon Lansing Gallery - Cornell Women's Hockey Defeats St. Lawrence and Clarkson

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Diane Duthie - Lansing GalleryCornell's Big Red Women's Hockey team defeated the St. Lawrence Saints on 11/30 .  Cornell won again, when they beat the Clarkson Golden Knights 3-1.  The wins elevated Cornell to 8-1-4 and to 6-1-1 in ECAC Hockey play.

Huge wins for Cornell, and many fans at Lynah Rink came to cheer them on!

Next up, Big Red will challenge Penn State at University Park, PA on January 8th.


Photos by Diane Duthie

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posticon What Have You Revealed About Yourself On Facebook?

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Facebook Data

We all hear stories about folks who were not hired, or -- worse -- fired because of their postings on social media.  Or arrested.  Despite the fact that social media postings are, for the most part, public, people post personal information, or incendiary posts about politics, religion, or other people they know.  Depending on your settings your posts may or may not be public, but even if not -- the services like Facebook are saving your posts, and well... you never know.  Even if the companies are protecting your privacy (which is the opposite of what social media is for) there are always hackers.

What's a body to do?  A good first step if you use Facebook is to take a look at what you have shared on and what Facebook thinks it knows about you.  While it is hard to believe for a company that notoriously shares user information and encourages its users to do so, Facebook does make it easy to see what you have done on the service since you first joined.  I recently tried it, and got all my posts, friend requests, photos and videos, comments, likes, and account activity all in one downloadable ZIP file.  After unzipping, I simply loaded the index.html file into a Web browser and everything was easily available for viewing, all the way back to when I joined in 2008.

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